Smashing Security podcast #009: False flags and hacker clues

Three security industry veterans, chatting about computer security and online privacy.

Graham Cluley
@gcluley

The Lazarus malware attempts to trick you into believing it was written by Russians, second-hand connected cars may be easier to steal, and is your child a malicious hacker?

All this and more is discussed by computer security veterans Graham Cluley, Vanja Svajcer and Carole Theriault.

Oh, and Carole makes Graham and Vanja apologise for their past mistakes.

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Graham Cluley is a veteran of the anti-virus industry having worked for a number of security companies since the early 1990s when he wrote the first ever version of Dr Solomon's Anti-Virus Toolkit for Windows. Now an independent security analyst, he regularly makes media appearances and is an international public speaker on the topic of computer security, hackers, and online privacy. Follow him on Twitter at @gcluley, or drop him an email.

One comment on “Smashing Security podcast #009: False flags and hacker clues”

  1. Did I ever tell you abuot the time, when I was working for IWS, and we'd just taken delivery of a new HP 3000, about two months later I managed to get it to print out every single password of everyone on the system? I left the printout on the desk of the IT manager at the time for him to find the next morning, and the resulting kerfuffle was most satisfying.

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