LinkedIn spam campaign promotes Viagra-pushing website

Graham Cluley
@gcluley

Have you received a message from LinkedIn asking you to confirm your email address?

Well, be careful before you click on the link in your inbox, as it could be scammers trying to dupe you into doing something else entirely.

Here’s a spam message that I saw, pretending to come from LinkedIn.

It arrived at an email address that I have never used for LinkedIn, so my alarm bell was already ringing. My natural instincts told me it was suspicious, and I guessed that if I clicked on “click here” I would be taken to a phishing website.

But I was wrong. When I did click on the first link in the email I wasn’t taken to a site trying to get my LinkedIn username and password. Instead, I was redirected to a online pharmaceutical store, offering to improve my performance between the sheets with a little help from Viagra, Cialis and Levitra.

Of course, it’s impossible for me to know with certainty whether the sexual performance drugs sold by this website are legitimate or not (The…

Read more in my article on the Naked Security website.

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Graham Cluley is a veteran of the anti-virus industry having worked for a number of security companies since the early 1990s when he wrote the first ever version of Dr Solomon's Anti-Virus Toolkit for Windows. Now an independent security analyst, he regularly makes media appearances and is an international public speaker on the topic of computer security, hackers, and online privacy. Follow him on Twitter at @gcluley, or drop him an email.

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